Medieval Coin

By Radmilo Bozinovic - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

From the advent of coinage more than 2,600 years ago, numismatics - the study of metal currency - has been a fascinating and rewarding endeavor. By studying the images represented, language of inscriptions, artistic expression, metal composition and more, we can often fine valuable evidence not only for a particular monetary economy, but also about distant times and societies, and the dynamics of their development. We hope that the material presented will illustrate the power of numismatic research, but even more so the rich historical experience of the times it covers.

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Image - SoldierExcerpts from the book: "1808/1918 Serbian Military Uniforms"

By Pavle Vasic

A uniformed Serbian militia is mentioned at the end of the seventeenth century after the siege of Vienna in 1683, but no details are known of its dress. It can be supposed that it derived from national costumes like the uniform introduced at the end of the first half of the eighteenth century. In the thirties on the initiative of the metropolitan Vikentije Jovanovic, a Serbian Hussar Regiment (1735) was formed which did not survive long. Nevertheless there are references to their dress: sabre, carbine and two pistols with green dolman and red breeches. Frontier regiments were uniformed in 1744 and this uniform had certain Hungarian traits until 1767, when it was tailored in the style of the Austrian infantry. This it retained until the Military frontier was abolished in 1873.

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Byzantine coinageBy Radmilo Bozinovic This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Since their first arrival on the Balkan penninsula early in the 6th c. and definite emergence on the historical scene, the South Slavs had their history and destiny inextricably tied with the Constantinopolitan state. Indeed, Balkan history throughout the medieval era (between late antiquity and the Ottoman invasion) closely parallels that of the Byzantine empire, which at different times acted as mentor, ally and foe of the Balkan Slav nations.

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By Sima Cirkovic

The preconditions for the creation of the Serbian nation came about in the seventh century when part of the Serbian tribes settled in the Roman province of Dalmatia, along with some of the other groups of Slavs.

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By Rados Ljusic


The Turkish conquest of the Balkans and Danube basin were preceded and followed by migrations of the Serbian people. As the Turks penetrated into the land the Serbs withdrew.

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The Balkan crisis concluded by the Berlin Treaty of 1878 represents a milestone in both European and Balkan history. For Europe it marked the disintegration of the newly formed Three Emperors' League of Germany, Austria, and Russia. This in turn meant the renewal and intensification of the Austro- Russian rivalry in the Balkans which started with the Crimean War. It also meant the re-emergence of Britain as an active force in European affairs after years of splendid isolation under Gladstone.

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by Carl Savich


The salient feature of the Congress of Berlin was the inequitable relationship between the Great powers and the Balkan nations and peoples. The Balkan states/nations and peoples were merely pawns or chattels for the imperialist powers to do with as they wished. They were merely chess pieces in a larger imperialist chess game. 

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Recollection of Relief Work in and Between Three Wars

Excerpts from "In the margines of chaos" by Francesca M. Wilson published in 1945 by The MacMillan Company, New York

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The Treaty of London, also known as the London Pact (Patto di Londra, in Italian), was negotiated secretly by three major Allied Powers (France, Russia, Great Britain) and Italy. Since the Italian territorial demands included the Yugo-Slavic lands under Austria-Hungary, the negotiations had to involve also the future borders of two cobelligerant Allied states, the kingdoms of Serbia and Montenegro.

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Gavrilo Princip and Patrick Pearse: Nationalism, Patriotism and Rebellion : A Comparison

By Carl Savich

"Gavrilo Princip. Patrick Pearse. Were they national heroes or scoundrels and criminal terrorists? Freedom fighters or suicide bombers? Heroes or terrorists?"

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By Ruth Mitchel. This extraordinary book is one of the rare accounts by a foreigner of World War II in Yugoslavia. The events of the early war years - the anti-Axis coup, German invasion and occupation, Serb resistance - all unfold against the backdrop of everyday hardship in occupied Serbia, in this deeply personal but illuminating account of an American woman who was there to both observe and participate.

Excerpts from "The Serbs Chose War" by Ruth Mitchell published in 1943 by Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 58-7242)

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By Tanja Vuleta, 1998

Serbian rulers' ceremonial costume emerged from its Byzantine counterpart at the very moment when Serbian rulers chose to get close to Byzantium, politically as well as in matters of religion. That costume clearly shows the manner in which governmental power was comprehended and considered at the time, while simultaneously being filled with profound religious meaning.

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